Block-of-the-Month · Piecing · Quilt Designs

New Skills

One of my Block-of-the-Month classes is actually a Row-of-the-Month class. It’s hosted at a local library by The Cottage Quilter and we’re doing the Piper Girls’ row-by-row sampler.

This week, we were assigned the pinwheel row and some homework. Check out my pretty pinwheels! I’ve also included the other rows we have done to date.

The pinwheel row was actually Row #4. Kelly (our instructor) didn’t want to assign Row #3 until next week because it’s a new skill for most of the class (yaaay!! I’m not the only n00b!!) and she wants us to practice at home before doing it for real on the quilt. It’s called machine applique. It’s “machine” because you do it with your sewing machine and not by hand (which is what many people prefer). What is applique, you ask?

Applique is when you take a piece of fabric, cut out a design, and stitch it on to your quilt top. A lot of quilters make large portions of their quilts this way. I’ve never seen the appeal of it. I like doing piecing, not applique. And yes – I did do one bit of machine applique when I first started (as you can see above). My first issue was that the applique was a star. I have always had problems making star shapes and it has always bothered me, even as a small child. It looks wonky to me and I don’t like it. My second issue was that this was done back in … September? Maybe? I was still very new at quilting and I think I took on a little too much too soon.

I decided that my class practice is going to be a for-real practice … maybe. ๐Ÿ˜€ I got this beautiful fabric from Troll Brothers to make an orange peel quilt. As soon as I get around to picking out a background fabric, I intend to start! The problem with the orange peel design is that 90% of the patterns are an applique pattern. You can do a pieced orange peel block, but there aren’t a lot of tutorials because it’s curved piecing and I think most people prefer applique to curved piecing.

I have to veer off a bit at this point to talk about acquiring patterns. I try (whenever possible) to purchase a pattern instead of just looking at the design and doing it myself. It’s not that I can’t do that (and for husband’s quilt and niece’s quilt, they are my designs), but if I’m going to use someone else’s creativity to make a project, I’d like to compensate them for the effort. Plus, they’ve done all the maths to figure out the right sizes of things so you don’t wind up with pieces that don’t fit together.. ๐Ÿ˜€ I’ve been doing this more frequently with my knitting projects. The nice thing is that yarn patterns are usually only a few dollars on Ravelry.com. I only make … sorry, start (see last blog post) … a couple of things a year, so it doesn’t break the bank. Quilting patterns are different. The “professional” patterns can be quite expensive. You can often get blocks for free, but doing applique or curved piecing requires having a template of some sort. Ordering acrylic templates for this pattern has been a huge pain in the butt for me since the only places currently offering the orange peel templates are out of the US of A and the UK. I absolutely refuse to pay a foreigner’s tax (aka the import fees or duty) on something someone in Canada probably has for sale but I just can’t find. After 3 days of searching, I finally found an extremely old free paper pattern that has the templates included! In the spirit of doing the old thing, I cut out some cardboard using the paper pattern as a template and pulled out some test fabric to figure out what I want to do.

First, I made the curved piecing version. I don’t mind sewing curved piecing that much, but my scrap fabric decision made pressing the fabric a bit onerous. You’re supposed to press out away from the peel. Since my peel was a very dark fabric and my background was a very light, see-through fabric, there would be serious ghosting happening. Ghosting happens when you can see the seam right through the fabric – this is why most quilters press with the seam under the dark side – less chance for ghosting. When I do my quilt, though, I’ll be using a darker background fabric, so this won’t be a problem in the official version. The other issue was the cardboard template itself. Because I’m using a rotary cutter, I have to be very careful that I’m not accidentally trimming the cardboard. Not only does this dull the blade and make a mess, but it changes the size of the template over time. The last block might end up smaller than the first block. When I go to make my quilt, I will either need to invest in acrylic templates or mark the shapes from the cardboard template with a pen before cutting along the pen line.

With the curved test out of the way, we move on to the applique test. The interesting part is that these blocks will end up a little bigger because I’m not losing 1/4″ on each side of each piece to a seam allowance. It’s good to keep in mind.

I cut out the orange peel from scraps first, then I cut a couple of squares to use. I was going to go with scrap squares, but I thought it would be fun to play with the opposite dynamics by cutting squares from the original matching fabrics. I did make a mistake, though. You have to attach fabric stabilizer to the back of your applique pieces to give it some rigidity during sewing and to help keep the edges from fraying if you’re doing a raw-edge applique (more on that later). Usually, you attach the stabilizer to the fabric, then cut (so you don’t see the white stabilizer showing). I forgot to do this part, so I had to attach the cut pieces to stabilizer, then cut around the shapes with scissors. It wasn’t bad this time, but making this same mistake with the star applique was the part of the reason it started looking wonky. I was very careful about setting the pieces in the dead center with the same amount of background space on the mirrored sides. This isn’t super crucial because you can re-cut the block properly square afterwords, but I’m aiming for right the first time.I loaded up my bobbin with dark green and selected a yellow embroidery thread for the top. I’ve used it a little bit in the past – it comes up as a golden colour. It might not work out, but this is a test piece and I wanted to know how this thread will hold up on future projects (since I’ve got 6 spools of the stuff to use).

Note: I should have posted this blog last week in keeping with my one-a-week resolution, but this was as far as I got before my busy week and away-weekend ended my spare time. I did consider posting just this much, then decided to do a two-blog week so I could finish out this story. ๐Ÿ™‚

My sewing machine has preset stitches specifically for machine applique. I didn’t know that when I made the star piece, so I made my life a little harder by having to manually set up my stitch type. This time, I just used my presets and it made life so much easier! I have three sizes for an applique satin stitch. In the samples, you will see me use sizes medium and small.

I started with the green-on-plaid piece under the medium satin stitch. The pictures should show why this is called a satin stitch – it looks soft and shiny when it’s done. After running for an inch or two with the default settings, I tightened up the stitch width to give it a bit more of that satiny sheen. In machine applique, the big challenge is points and turning corners. From the very limited reading I did on this (because why wouldn’t I want to learn the hard way with no pointers?? ๐Ÿ˜‰ ), the two main ways of turning corners is to slowly walk around the point or to stitch slightly past the point, stitch backwards, turn the corner, stitch back again to get a sharpish point, then continue forwards. With green-on-plaid, I decided to try the walkaround method. From what I understand, the key to this method is making sure you always have your needle stop on the applique-side of the stitch, turn the fabric slightly, make another two stitches so you land back at the same spot on the applique side, and re-adjust again. You keep doing this until you are completely around the corner. As you can see, I needed a couple of attempts to get it looking okay.

Next up was the plaid-on-green with the small satin stitch. This was much harder as my margin for error with the edges of the applique piece was much tighter. With the medium stitch, all I had to do was make sure that the edge was somewhere between the two 1/8″ marks. This also allowed me to make a more gradual curve if my cuts were a little choppy (putting the interface on after cutting the shape only makes this worse). With the smaller stitch, I had to follow my cuts exactly. There are a couple of places where you can tell I didn’t schwoop very nicely in my cuts, but whatever – practice pieces! I also tried the back-and-forward corner method for the points this time. I think, in some ways, it actually works best with the small satin stitch because the tiny size hides the stitches a bit. In other ways, not so much – because stitch is so small, the edge of the applique was fraying a bit as I attempted to sink my stitches into the edge without having the applique fabric show on both sides of my stitches. At the corner, this fraying gets worse because I’m going back over it two extra times. Time will tell if the applique stands ups with the small stitch.

Look at me! I can machine applique!

My two completed looks! I had already decided before stitching that I didn’t like the green-on-plaid near as well. The patterned piece just looks better as a focal point. I’m still glad I went ahead with it, though, because I learned something else. When stitching on the applique, the background fabric got a little warped. It’s not bad and it will almost completely vanish once the the block is stitched in place, but it is a lot more obvious that it’s happening when you use a pattern fabric as your background fabric. Learning things! I also think I prefer the look of the small stitch over the look of the medium stitch as it starts to take emphasis away from the applique. I can’t even begin to imagine how the “big” satin stitch would turn out! I want to make two more of these blocks so I can make a completed orange peel block – maybe I’ll try the big satin stitch on one of them, just to see!

Orange peel quilt colors … so much in love!!!

Finally, I’m also glad I waited until after I got home before posting this because … I found the background fabric for my orange peel! Won’t it look nice with the charcoal grey?? I was in Ottawa, Ontario for the weekend visiting a friend and I made them pull over at a local fabric store (Sew For It) to see if I could find something. Good news – I found something! Bad news – there was only maybe 1/2 a meter left on the bolt. Not very much at all, maybe not even enough. I have to measure it out and see. I took what they had left just in case – worst case scenario, I’ll stash it and get something else. Oh darn. ๐Ÿ˜€ Because there’s so little of it, I will definitely be doing the curved piecing over the applique because I won’t have fabric to spare hiding under the orange peel. It was still worth doing the applique work just to learn how to do it. ๐Ÿ™‚ No time is wasted time if you learn things!

~M

Piecing · Quilt Designs

Distracted Again …

Oh, it’s good to be distracted again!
I sorta kinda thought my quilting mojo had gone
It never had vanished, it’s just moving on …

Muppets Take Manhattan, creative liberties taken (in case you were wondering).

As you may have noticed from my last couple entries, I was starting to get frustrated with the process. I simply had no drive to do the quilting piecing I thought I needed to do. Oh, once the piecing was done, I was happy to have done it … but the process getting there was aggravating. I’ve learned through it that this is a hobby. If I don’t feel like doing it, I probably shouldn’t do too much of it. It just becomes work and that becomes stressful, not enjoyable, and then I avoid my sewing room. I don’t want to avoid my sewing room! I love my little room! That means I need to let myself do some of my fun sewing for a while. I think we all know what that means …

TIGER QUILT TIME!!!

I managed to get the other two colours cut and pieced (totaling 4 pieces each) and get the cutting done for another round. I need 9 blocks of each for the baby quilts I was originally planning to do. After the 9 each colour (27 total) are done, I’m going to build a planning wall and start playing with the blocks to see if we’re sticking with the baby quilt plan or making an M quilt. ๐Ÿ™‚ I deserve a quilt too!!! (studiously ignores the large pile of De La Luna fabric I purchased specifically for an M quilt). It’s a little nerve-wracking, cutting into the middle of the fabric for the tiger faces and leaving big holes in the fabric. I have to be aware that I’ll be cutting more of these faces out and try not to take any extra. It’s a challenge – a fun challenge!

After piecing all the blocks, I laid them out on the bed to play around with making them into a large quilt. This is when I realized the bed is no longer a useful place to do this for several reasons.

1. We have separate bedding. I know this sounds very strange, but we both sleep much better if we have our own pile of blankets. That is the main reason the husband quilt is the husband’s quilt – a very large twin quilt. Having two sets of sheets and blankets on the bed make the terrain very uneven for laying out piecing.
2. I sleep with a body pillow. And not just any body pillow – a massive U-shaped pregnancy pillow. Husband bought it for Christmas for me a couple of years ago and I am IN LOVE with it! It replaced the 5-6 pillows that used to do the same thing (Husband would refer to it as the M barricade ๐Ÿ˜€ ). It makes my side of the bed an insurmountable pillow mountain.
3. Golddurn cats. The cat hideout is the bed. It’s too high for Snowdog the Wimp Dog to jump down from (it’s really not, but he thinks it is), so he won’t climb onto it after the cats because he knows we’ll leave him up there until we’re good and ready to rescue him. ๐Ÿ˜€ I don’t mind the kitty snuggles at night – they love to curl up at my feet. But dare I try to use the bed as a table for any reason – quilt piecing, filing sorting, laundry sorting, outfit planning – Neiko is in the middle of it, whining and crying and looking for the absolutely most obnoxious place to lay down on.

For these reasons, I’m going to try to figure out how to make a fold-able or a modular design wall. What’s a design wall, you ask? Sorry, I’m getting ahead of myself! It’s usually a piece of styrofoam backed by a thin pressure board (also known as “plywood”) for stability and covered with flannel. Some of you old-timey Sunday School attendees might remember the Sunday School teacher using something like this to make pictures of the Bible story she was telling. A quick Google tells me this is actually called Flannelgraph … who knew??

There are so many ideas for these walls, including retractable (think of a pull-down window blind) or curtained. I’m going to have to do some reading up and see what works!! I can’t use anything that needs to be bolted to the wall. We want to sell our little house when Husband is finished renoing, so I’m keeping the holes to a minimum!

I totally meant to try this with the purple tigers in the middle – it has elements of both the other colourways in it – but I completely forgot. ๐Ÿ˜€ I like the idea of having pink in the middle though. It’s a warm break between the two cooler colours.

The next series of blocks should not take me long to finish at all, so hopefully by next blog, I’ll some ideas for them. If we’re lucky, I might even have a design wall of some sort … wait … I just had an epiphany … OHHHHHH THIS COULD BE FUN!

Stay tuned for more exciting adventures of Auntie M’s quilts!! (You always leave the episode on a cliffhanger, right? ๐Ÿ˜‰ )

~M

Block-of-the-Month · Piecing · Quilt Designs

Ohhh the Grandma Quilt …

I shouldn’t complain so much. This problem is not limited to the Grandma quilt. My problem is me. I have a lack of attention to detail. Most of the time, I catch my own mistakes before they get too bad. Other times – like recently, when my head was full of flu – I do myself no favours.

For example: my block-of-the-month with Fabric Chick. It was a super easy block this month. I read it several times, did my sewing, read it again, did my cutting … and I cut a block in the wrong direction. I couldn’t make it work with what I had, no matter what I tried. My only option was to dip into my scraps and make a new block to cut. Unfortunately, I cut a big block, so I didn’t have big enough scraps to make a new block. That mean sewing scraps together to make a big enough block (aka Frankenstein block). ugh ….

Moving on to the Grandma quilt. I already knew I would have to do this because I ran out of one kind of fabric and I couldn’t get any more of it. When I was getting ready to put the project on hold back in October, I measured out what I would need to finish and went trash-diving for scraps to make up blocks. I thought I would need a lot more blocks than I eventually wound up making, so I have lots left to play with now.

The scrap pile and the “trash” can

At this point, I needed to figure out where the Frankenstein blocks were going to go. My original plan was to make the bottom two small stars out of Frankies. That was before I realized I had to rip out the finished top row to make my new piecing techniques fit (quiet crying commences). One of the upsides of ripping out the top row was having access to the top corner stars. By this point, I had realized that I only needed to make two Frankenstein squares and had decided to put them in the star points, where I figured it would be less noticeable. Each corner small star only had the points showing on two sides, so I only needed to make two star-point blocks for all four corners (two green/white and two purple/white). This will make more sense when the quilt is finished.

After piecing the Frankenstein squares, I started cutting up everything left for piecing. When I first started this quilt, I cut and pieced row by row. I’m still having trouble getting motivated to work on this quilt, so I thought motivation might be easier to achieve if I created all my blocks in one fell swoop and pieced afterwards. That sort of worked and sort of backfired. ๐Ÿ˜€

Pieced star (before ripping out)

Before going any further, let’s re-visit the 4-at-a-time half-square triangles (HSTs). The steps are as follows:
1. Cut your two fabric squares of the same size.
2. Sew the squares together around all 4 edges.
3. Cut point-to-point across (2-3 cuts, results in 4 pieces). This is where the 45 degree angle ruler came in handy to make sure I was squared up properly!
4. Press open squares to get 4 completed HSTs.

There is also a 2-at-a-time and an 8-at-a-time HST option. I really wish I’d know of the 8-at-a-time when I did the husband quilt (100% HSTs), but I’d only known about the 2-at-a-time. Ah well – we learn as we go!

Back to my project:
I cut up everything, ran them through the sewing machine, re-cut the HSTs, then ironed everything open. And immediately had problems. I’d evidently forgotten to cut two pieces of the green-only fabric for my small star centers, so I had pieces that were only purple, but nicely sewn together and cut up. *facepalm*. This meant ripping out the purple squares, cutting the green pieces to the original size, cross-cutting the pieces, then matching them to the purple triangles. I was really not on the ball, so I accidentally ripped out several purple HSTs that had been properly pieced to white, so I had to sew all those back together too … only to find out I’d gotten some of the purple pieces mixed up and the Frankie triangles were sewn to the wrong triangles. Ohhhh what a day.

Needless to say, I quit half-way through the re-piecing project that day. When you discover you’re making that many mistakes, take a break! I came back a couple of days later and finished piecing and cutting up the squares. I started working on my chintz pieces and realized that I needed to check the spin direction against the squares I had already done. Since I really did not want to mess with the purple-and-green small stars again, I checked them first. Thankfully, everything was spinning the same way – purple to green in a clockwise fashion. I took a picture of my remaining blocks to make sure that everyone was spinning the right way for the whole quilt. In future star quilts, I think I’d make a hemispheric spin – everything on the right spins opposite to that on the left. The one square I’d gotten wrong looked really nice sitting beside the original spin. In this case, however, I’d gotten way too far into the quilt to change what I was doing. Maybe if I’d been more motivated about this quilt, I would have changed it – but now I just want it DONE.

I watched through several Marvel comics movies to keep myself focused. One of the good piecing sessions happened during the Thor: Ragnarok viewing. I love my sewing space!

Cate Blanchett in Thor: Ragnarok

Next week is all about mini projects. I have a plan for my block-of-the-month projects – but I just have to stay focused!!

~M

Quilt Designs · Sewing Room

My First UFO

Another first! I’m pulling out my first UFO to complete! It’s not really a UFO – I only packed it away in November so I could focus on the husband quilt, but that’s the longest I’ve left a sewing project so far (the planned but un-executed ones don’t count, right?? As long as you don’t cut the fabric you bought for it, you’re safe). Wait wait … I’m wrong. I have a UFO sampler cut up in a box, but it’s a tiny 20″x20″ sample to play with flying geese. Still doesn’t count!! ๐Ÿ˜€

One of the reasons it got pushed to the side was the fabric. I bought part of the fabric from Fabricland, only to realize a month later that I was going to need more of a certain print. Guess what they don’t have any more of??? After a lot of careful measuring and cutting of what I had left (how I regret you, wastefully cut material!), I think I have just enough to finish it with a little creativity one corner block. At this point, I placed up everything I had (including the completed row), popped it in a comforter bag, and focused on my priorities (coughCHALLENGE BAG!coughTIGER QUILT!sniffle). Husband’s quilt = done! Dad’s quilt = done! On to Grandma’s quilt. I do have a wedding quilt to make for September as well, but Grandma is turning 95 in August. If I miss the wedding deadline, the couple should still be here (and married) by next year. 95-year-old grandmothers might not be. That makes her the priority. And this particular UFO was started with her specifically in mind.

The first row – quilt set aside after I got this far.

I got this pattern from the very first episode of the Midnight Quilt Show. It’s an 8-point star quilt featuring two sizes of star. The original pattern makes a 60″x60″ quilt, but I wanted something king-ish sized. I assume that this quilt will be coming back to me when she stops using it and I like quilts with a good length of overhang … so this puppy is going to be 90″x90″. Won’t that be fun to FMQ on my domestic sewing machine!! ๐Ÿ˜€

CHINTZ!!!

Step one was figuring out all the measurements at half-again-as much (full size plus half the size – 60+30=90). Second step was the fabric. When I raided the Mother-In-Law’s stash for the husband quilt, I also pulled a bunch of floral/chintz fabric that caught my eye. When I started on this quilt, I went through my pulled MIL fabric and thought some of it looked suitably grandmotherly while still being appealing for my personal use. The only trouble is that it has stripes in it, which could be tough with the 8-point stars because of directional fabric. I wrote up a quick diagram to see if I could get the striped fabric to work for me … and it does!

Scribbles … they make sense to me!!

The secret is to used one striped and one non-striped fabric in each star (I do have one star with two striped fabrics, but I didn’t really have a choice. It looks okay, but not as good as one-striped-fabric only). I divvied up the stuff that worked best together. My two chintz fabrics were from the same line, one with a stripe and one without. The striped went into a large star where I would have space to use it nicely and the non-stripe went into the small star (less stripe space). I know, I know – the stripes don’t totally line up on the cut between the box and the star points. I think it looks okay this way – not amazing, but okay. I know there’s a different way to make these stars without cutting the points off, but I’m still learning and this is the best I can do with the skills I have now. And it’s not terrible – the stripes are still all going the same way, so it doesn’t clash too hard.

The purple fabric pile were the purchased fabrics to round out this quilt. It looks surprisingly good! Since I needed a striped fabric to match my purples, I found the Lavender Meadows fabric at FibreChick and FELL IN LOVE!! I’m super excited about how it looks!

Now, to actually get to work on the dumb quilt. I am soย unmotivated!! I don’t know what’s wrong! Every time I go upstairs to work, I wind up making something else completely. So far, it’s been the tiger quilt, my brother-in-law’s wedding quilt planning, and the optional quilt guild row-by-row. I just can’t get excited about it. I’m even bailing on working on it right now to write this blog … heh heh …

Evidently I have better things to do, so I’m going to go force myself to do exactly that. Or ditch completely go shopping!!

~M

Quilt Designs · Sewing Room

Dessert First …

Ohhhh what a week I had last week. I had a last-minute interview notice for a new job (36 hours to create a presentation, practice it, and prep for the interview questions) Monday to Wednesday. I’m also part of a community choir and our performance was Saturday, so we had two extra practices plus the performance. I crashed on Sunday … but not before getting out my woefully late blog post. ๐Ÿ˜‰

This week is different. Monday night was Guild night. It’s so nice to be able to take a break once a month to bond with people who share your interests! Tuesday and Wednesday are work-from-home days due to the terrible snowstorm. They’re calling for 25-30cm!! That’s 10-12 inches for our Imperial system visitors. Absolutely crazy – spring can’t come soon enough! I must say though – being able to quit work at my normal time and be sewing within a minute is a pleasant experience. ๐Ÿ™‚

Probably to no one’s surprise, I caved to my tiger-face baby quilt project. I couldn’t help myself … I just had to see it in reality!!

Tiger Face!!! 6″ square finished block will be fine

I’m using the pink fabric as my pilot quilt because I can just go get more of it if I screw up too badly. Replacing the rest of it would be a combination of waiting for a shipment to flat-out not being able to find any. During my initial measurements, I realized to my horror that I was going to be three squares short of the purple diamonds. It must have been a popular print because I was having trouble finding any on this side of the border. I put out a call on Facebook to see if anyone would sell me enough to finish my quilt. An absolute saint of a quilter in Ottawa sent me exactly what I needed – absolutely free of charge. Angels must exist!

Hand-drawn diagrams help me visualize

I started with the planning phase. I got inspired at one of the guild meetings this fall with disappearing blocks and I thought a disappearing nine-patch would show off that tiger face perfectly. Since the rest of the nine-patch becomes a border to the corner or main squares (the tiger squares), I decided to use the diamond fabric as “sashing” squares and the lotus flowers as the “corner stone” square. I would have to rotate the tiger faces so the would all point the same direction after cutting the block, but that’s not a problem. I intend to add an outer row of sashes and corner stones to close in the design of the quilt at the end.

First issue – them diamonds. The diamond fabric is a directional fabric, so it only flows left-to-right or up-and-down. Sewing the nine-patch then cutting it makes the diamonds look wonky. I did it once to see if there was a chance it would work anyways, but no dice. It is no longer a true disappearing nine-patch – I’m cutting and piecing the face blocks individually.

Next issue – I didn’t like it!! The pretty pink diamond clashed too much with the focus tiger face fabric. And that’s when I noticed the turquoise lotus flower fabric was really pulling the design together … so I swapped them. The sashing is now the lotus flower and the corner stone is the diamonds. I think it looks much nicer this way. Second opinion (husband) agreed with me. He’s not the sort of fellow to tell me something looks nice just for the sake of my feelings (he still has a very strong opinion on the eagle-iness of my last quilt and it’s not a positive one), so I know it’s definitely the right choice.

I also learned a bit about my piecing issues. I’m not the most precise piecer, but I’m working on it and I’m learning from the mistakes I create. That will have to be it’s own blog post at some point.


Bjรธrn the Snowdog and Tiger Face

The final product. I have to make five more blocks, then the sashing-corner stone strip before the quilt top is done, but the design is solidly visible, so I’m content to put it in the UFO (UnFinished Objects) bin for now. Besides – once I have all three colors finished, I might be tempted to make myself a full-size quilt top instead. Wouldn’t that just be a shame … ๐Ÿ˜‰

~M

Quilt Designs

Fun with Sashing

It turns out the that the outer sashing was its own monster, so it gets its own post. ๐Ÿ™‚

Why is it a monster? Because I’m still stuck on making the bark run the same direction and I wanted the corners to all meet on angles. I could have done straight seams like I did on the border sashing, but the easy way is for suckers, right?

Enter problem 1 – do you make the mitered seams before you attache the sashing to the quilt or after? You could definitely do it before (and I did the first corner this way), but you have to have very exact measurements on the length of the quilt before doing that.

Pre-sewn mitered corner

You also have to make sure you’re putting it on the right way. I did not do that the first time around and had to rip it out. You also have to measure 1/4″ in on the quilt edge when you’re starting so the next strip is lined up in the right place to sew down the side. I started at the corner, sewed down one side, broke thread, and went back to the corner to start the second side. It wasn’t perfect, but it looked almost perfect.

Close enough!

The other three corners were done manually at the corner. I came up with this method without looking it up online. It works pretty well as long as your strips are sewn straight and you’re careful with your corner measurements. You’re going to see a mix of corners used as examples – that’s because I was not careful with my measurements the first time and I had to rip it out a couple of times.

Step 1. Sew two strips, stopping 1/4″ from the end of the quilt.
I left a very short strip the first time for one of the strips and it was very difficult to get the sides lined up properly. I’d recommend leaving yourself a minimum of 2″ of fabric off the side so you have space to play with the material, especially the first time around. To find the 1/4″ mark (or the place where the two strips meet), I used a pin to mark it. When sewing toward the pin, I stopped when I was close and veryย slowlyย sewed up to the mark, set the stitch, and broke thread. When starting at the pin, I used the flywheel to insert the needle right in front of the pin. We all know not to sew over pins, right? Bad baaad things follow, like exploding needles (not that it’s ever happened to me and especially not as recently as last week … )

Step 2. Mark the miter to sew.
I made a fold mark to show where to sew the miter seams together. To find that, I fold the strip underย itself andย away from the side of the quilt. I usually do one side then the other before completely flattening the seam. You can tell if you have a good 45 degree angle if the folded fabric fits nicely along the other unfolded strip while staying square to the edge. I had to fudge at least one of the corners to make them meet on the second fold, but you have a bit of leeway here as long as it isn’t pulled out of square too far. Remember – you’re going to be trimming the corners before binding and the binding will cover it.
This is where I use my Violet Craft seam roller that I picked up at the Cottage Quilter this fall. It is SO HANDY!! I throw this in my bag to flatten seams when sewing with a group so I don’t have to fight over plug space for a hot iron. I don’t recommend this method for lots of piecing, but it is perfect for travel or for little piecing bits like this where I just need to make a little folded seam without moving the fabric.

Step 3. Stitch & Press
Line up the two folds and pin them together for stability. I also use my Frixion highlighter to mark the start of the seam. I find that the fold mark flattens to invisibility when it’s under the piecing foot, so I need to see the start mark. Did you know that Frixion pens were originally used in offices for taking notes way back in the day because you could “erase” your mistakes with a little heat? I had no idea! Kim at FibreChick told me that! She also showed me an example she had of a block that she had marked up with a Frixion pen that had gotten left in the car. Those lovely -30 Celcius temperatures that we’re having here in Canada brought back every single mark super clear – so don’t use it to mark your quilt top!!! Although … wouldn’t that be a cool thing to do for a child’s memory quilt? Get them to write on the quilt and chill the quilt anytime you wanted to see their notes.
In the last image, you can see the miter-in-place corner verses the pre-mitered corner strip. They both look pretty good, right?

So … which method would I choose? I liked how much easier the pre-mitered sashing was, but since I’m terrible at making things come out perfectly, I have to say I’ll probably be sticking with the miter-in-place method. Of course, there is an alternative to this.

DON’T MITER YOUR STINKIN’ SASHING!! ๐Ÿ˜‰

The quilt is now basted and on the machine for some free-motion loveliness. With any luck, it will be done in time for Dad’s birthday on Saturday, but barring that, it will be ready for when they come down to visit on the 9th and ready for sharing in next week’s post!

~M

Quilt Designs

Gonna Fly Like An Eagle …

Here’s the story of Dad’s quilt, also referred to as the Mile High quilt in one entry … not sold on that title, now that I’ve thought on it a bit. It might just remain “Dad’s quilt”.

This is my first panel quilt (not such a shock since this is only my second quilt). It started with receiving a meter of heavily patterned fabric at a guild swap (Canadian, remember? No yards). I tucked it in the bottom of my fabric bucket for a future project. I was already thinking it might be nice for my dad because he love eagles, but that’s as far as I got. Fast forward 3 months and what do I see on one of my Facebook fabric groups but a lovely big eagle panel. I thought it would probably look nice with my stashed fabric and, if it didn’t, I’d make the panel for Dad and work up something else with the stash fabric. We were experiencing a postal strike at the time, so it took forever for the panel to arrive. Imagine my shock when I discovered that, not only did the two pieces work well together, but they were from the same line! It was Kauffman’s reproduction of James Hautman for both fabric. Super crazy!

Next came the planning phase. I measured the panel and started measuring runs of fabric. I wanted the eagles in the stash fabric to show prominently in a border around the panel, but since I had a limited amount to work with, I had to be sure that what I would cut would fit around. Also – I’m a bit into fussy cutting, so I measured the stash cuts in such a way to make sure that the eagles were all flying the right direction (it will make sense in a later picture). I quickly came to realize that I could do a border, but I would have to get a little creative with it since there was not quite enough fabric to go around.

Selected fabrics (repost)

This facilitated a trip to the local quilt store, The Cottage Quilter. Kelly had showcased a quilt top with some very interesting fabrics at one of the guild meetings that I thought would work perfectly. Northcott Fabric had release a line of natural fabrics. They looked like river stones, bark, leaves, or evergreen needles. The birch bark had especially caught my attention and I wanted to use it to add a small border between the panel and the eagle borders. When I first suggested the eagle borders, my husband said it made the quilt too eagle-y. He’s probably right, but it’s something my dad will love, so I decided to just break it up a bit with the birch bark around. Because the borders aren’t quite big enough to reach each other, I decided that all the border sections will be outlined in the birch. I also picked up a meter of pine needle fabric for the binding.

Cutting time!

All the cutting fun!

I started with the measurements I’d jotted down to cut up the eagle border. There would have to be some bias joining, but it was the only way to get a couple of pieces long enough. Then I moved on to the birch bark. Ohhhh boy … fussy cutting again. Not only do the eagles all have to point the same way, but of course the birch bark has to point the same way as well. You can’t have birch bark growing willy-nilly! I laid out the quilt pieces and measured how much I was going to need to go around the inside and line the two pieces. Then I cut – two cuts in one direction, two cuts in the other direction. This would give me the most even amount of pieces to create the birch sashing. Otherwise, it would look like one direction was all single pieces and the other direction was all bias patchwork. So much folding and cutting.

Once every thing was cut, I started piecing the borders and adding them to the panel. This should have been a very fast process. However, I learned two things.
1. Piecing long strips together actually takes more time than piecing up blocks.
2. Sometimes I make changes to the quilt after I’ve pieced it and have to rip out the piecing. And sometimes – I change my mind more than once. :S
I want this to look good, though! So the ripping and re-piecing happens.

I just have to add the outer birch sashing, make a quilt sandwich, and start my quilting! Dad’s birthday is Feb 2, so my vacation next week is probably going to have a lot of sewing in it to make that deadline. I’m seeing my parents on the 9th, though, so I have some cheat time in there. For the backing, I’m using fabric I bought to use as backing for the husband quilt. I switched to a different backing after finding THE PERFECT BACKING at The Cottage Quilter, so I’m stash busting for the back too!

Brown backing (check out the directional birch cuts)

And now for something completely different.

Tula Pink’s Eden line

My Tula fabric arrived!! Aren’t the colourways stunning??? I can’t wait to cut into them … this summer … because I have other responsibilities … Who wants to take a bet that I can’t wait that long?

~M